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Dr Christopher Wiley presents paper at Popular Music Education Symposium at Western University, Ontario, Canada

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Dr Christopher Wiley addressed the inaugural ‘Progressive Methods in Popular Music Education’ Symposium at Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, on Friday 8 June 2018, presenting remotely via video-conference link from his office at the University of Surrey.

Dr Wiley’s paper, ‘From Research-led Teaching to Teaching-led Research: Keeping Curricula Contemporary in Higher Education Popular Music’, discussed the relationship between teaching and research in twenty-first-century UK higher education, with specific reference to his delivery of an undergraduate module on Adele’s 25 album.

A previous version of his presentation had been given at an international conference at the Institute of Musical Research, London (UK) in April 2018, focussing on the use of autoethnography as the principal methodology for the study rather than on the pedagogy of popular music education and the curriculum design itself.

The two-day Symposium was hosted by the Don Wright Faculty of Music, concurrently with MayDay Group Colloquium 30. Together the two events attracted a diverse line-up of presenters as well as over 100 registered delegates.

Further information about the ‘Progressive Methods in Popular Music Education’ Symposium is available online: http://www.music.uwo.ca/outreach/symposium-on-progressive-methods.html

The conference programme may be downloaded here: http://www.music.uwo.ca/outreach/images-pdf/mayday-progressive-methods-conference-program-2018.pdf

And presenter abstracts are available here: http://www.music.uwo.ca/outreach/images-pdf/PM-Abstracts-Fri.pdf

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Dr Christopher Wiley organizes and presents paper at major international conference at the Institute of Musical Research, London

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Institute of Musical Research - Court Room

Dr Christopher Wiley has organized the two-day international conference, ‘Beyond “Mesearch”: Autoethnography, Self-Reflexivity, and Personal Experience as Academic Research in Music Studies’, held at the Institute of Musical Research, University of London, on 16-17 April 2018.

The conference, which was supported by the Institute of Musical Research as well as the University of Surrey, drew strong interest from a large international delegation of around 80 participants from across the UK, Europe, North America, and Australia.

It featured three keynote addresses and 20 papers arranged in a series of parallel sessions, together with an innovative group discussion session (which may form a model to be adopted more widely at future conferences in music studies) in which delegates separated into smaller breakout groups led by a senior academic before reporting back to the conference.

Dr Wiley also chaired a number of sessions and facilitated discussions on a range of topics, as well as delivering his paper ‘From Research-led Teaching to Teaching-led Research: An autoethnographic enquiry into keeping curricula contemporary in higher education popular music’, elements of which have previously been presented at academic forums in both music and education studies.

This event followed the success of the multi-disciplinary conference recently co-organized by Dr Wiley, Writing About Contemporary Artists: Challenges, Practices, and Complexities’, held at the University of Surrey from 20-22 October 2017.

Dr Wiley previously co-organized a two-day international conference, ‘Musical Biography: National Ideology, Narrative Technique, and the Nature of Myth’, at the Institute of Musical Research in April 2015.

Further information about the ‘Beyond “Mesearch”’ conference may be found at the website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-music-media/research/autoethnography-and-self-reflexivity-music-studies

The full programme, including abstracts, is available here: https://christopherwiley.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/imr-beyond-mesearch-conference-programme-16-17-april-2018.pdf

 

Dr Christopher Wiley leads session at University of Surrey Teaching Symposium

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Dr Christopher Wiley at Surrey ExciTeS 2018Dr Christopher Wiley delivered a presentation and facilitated the ensuing discussion at the University of Surreys fifth annual Surrey ExciTeS (Excellence in Teaching Symposium) on Wednesday 3 January 2018.

His session, ‘From Research-led Teaching to Teaching-led Research: Keeping curricula contemporary’, explored the relationship between teaching and research and its implications for maintaining up-to-the-minute taught university curricula, for which substantial original research may necessarily be undertaken by the lecturer for the express purposes of teaching (as distinct from research previously conducted with a view to publication and used within the classroom only as a secondary endeavour).

To illustrate his arguments, Dr Wiley outlined aspects of the design of his first-year undergraduate module on Adele’s 25 album, previously discussed in a roundtable panel he convened for the Study Day on ‘Teaching and Creativity in Popular Music’ held at the University of Surrey on 10 June 2017.

Dr Wiley concluded his session by contending that the dichotomy often posited in the academic profession between teaching and research, typically viewed as two distinct (if not mutually exclusive) activities, is unhelpful for its omitting to take account of the extent of the middleground between them. He further suggested that just as teaching may be research-led, (pedagogic) research may itself correspondingly be led by teaching.

Dr Wiley has participated in all four previous Surrey ExciTeS events, delivering sessions in 201720162015, and 2014.

Two doctoral students supervised by Dr Christopher Wiley present at a major international conference

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Two doctoral students supervised by Dr Christopher Wiley presented papers at a major international conference, ‘Imagining Communities Musically: Putting Popular Music in its Place’, held by the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) last week at the University of Salford.

Sini Timonen, who is in the closing stages of her PhD on women musicians’ contribution to popular music in England between 1962 and 1971, gave a paper entitled ‘The Girl Singer in 1960s London: the Position of Female Vocalists within the Pop Music Industry’. Drawing on original interviews conducted with lesser-known ‘Brit Girls’ active on the London pop scene in the sixties, Sini explored the major challenges they faced, the strategies by which they navigated them, and the implications of the essentially male-oriented contexts in which they worked.

Alexander Jeffery presented the paper Reconfiguring Prince: how online fan communities are taking back control of the album, in which he examined traditions amongst Prince fans active in online forums of proposing their own alternative track listings for landmark albums such as Purple Rain as well as abandoned album projects. Alex, who has recently entered his second year on the doctoral programme, is conducting research on manifestations of the long-form musical work in contemporary popular culture.