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Dr Christopher Wiley co-authors presentation at International Symposium on Pedagogic Frailty at the University of Surrey

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Pedagogic-frailty-symposium-programmeDr Christopher Wiley and Jo Franklin (Guildford School of Acting) co-authored an interactive presentation delivered as part of the First International Symposium on Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience held at the University of Surrey on Wednesday 6 September 2017.

The session, entitled ‘Dialogic Approaches to Pedagogic Frailty’, explored how the authors had proactively sought to extend the results of two previous research projects in which they had been separately involved, including Dr Wiley’s co-authored autoethnographic study of pedagogic frailty in arts and humanities education.

They outlined the ‘reciprocal autoethnography’ approach by which they expanded the parameters of their earlier studies, as well as the methods by which they comparatively analysed the concept maps that resulted from previous research, independently of the original interviewer.

Based on their book chapter on autoethnography and pedagogic frailty, the presentation concluded by considering the potential for future expansion of the pedagogic frailty process as well as its benefits in terms of enhancing understanding of the preoccupations, priorities, and motivations of colleagues and teams.

The one-day symposium brought together some 40 academic colleagues from across the UK and internationally.

Further information about the symposium is available at the following link: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-higher-education/events/pedagogic-frailty

The full programme, including abstracts, may be downloaded here: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Pedagogic-frailty-symposium-programme.pdf

 

Dr Christopher Wiley co-authors book chapter on autoethnography and pedagogic frailty

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Pedagogic FrailtyDr Christopher Wiley and Jo Franklin (Guildford School of Acting) have co-authored a chapter published in the book Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience in the University, edited by Ian M. Kinchin and Naomi E. Winstone.

Their essay, ‘Framed Autoethnography and Pedagogic Frailty: A Comparative Analysis of Mediated Concept Maps’, extends two research projects on which the authors have previously worked, including Dr Wiley’s co-authored autoethnographic study of pedagogic frailty in arts and humanities education.

Adopting a ‘reciprocal autoethnography’ approach to operate independently of the original interviewer in order comparatively to analyse the concept maps that resulted from earlier research, they considered the benefits of pedagogic frailty to the development of greater mutual understanding between different staff members by way of nurturing resilience.

Bibliographic citation 

Wiley, Christopher and Jo Franklin. ‘Framed Autoethnography and Pedagogic Frailty: A Comparative Analysis of Mediated Concept Maps’, in Ian M. Kinchin and Naomi E. Winstone eds. Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience in the University. Rotterdam: Sense, 2017, pp. 17–32.

Further information 

Listing of the volume on the publisher’s website: https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/other-books/pedagogic-frailty-and-resilience-in-the-university/

Dr Christopher Wiley co-authors journal article on pedagogic frailty in arts and humanities education

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Dr Christopher Wiley and Professor Ian M. Kinchin (Department of Higher Education, University of Surrey) have co-authored an article published in the international peer-reviewed journal Arts and Humanities in Higher Education

Entitled ‘Tracing pedagogic frailty in arts and humanities education: An autoethnographic perspective’, the article represents an autoethnographic study of Dr Wiley as a leading academic in arts and humanities teaching in higher education, using Professor Kinchin’s model of pedagogic frailty (see diagram below) in order to develop a series of mediated concept maps.

Supplemented by Dr Wiley’s own narratives and with an extended conclusion contemplating the benefits of pedagogic frailty and the autoethnographic process, it constitutes the most extensive single-subject study of pedagogic frailty in higher education to date.

Dr Wiley has previously used autoethnographic approaches in relation to pedagogic research in an article published in Learning at City Journal in 2014.

Further information about Professor Kinchin and Dr Wiley’s journal article, including the abstract, may be found at the following link: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1474022217698082

Bibliographic citation 

Kinchin, Ian M. and Christopher Wiley. ‘Tracing pedagogic frailty in arts and humanities education: An autoethnographic perspective’, Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An international journal of theory, research, and practice (2017), pp. 1–24. doi: 10.1177/1474022217698082

Full text

The full text is available for free download under licence from Surrey Research Insight Open Access: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/813547/

Pedagogic-frailty

 

The School of Arts at the University of Surrey celebrates top rankings in The Guardian’s University League Tables 2017

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The-Guardian-logo-100x100The School of Arts at the University of Surrey is celebrating excellent rankings in The Guardian’s UK University League Tables 2017, published today as part of the Guardian University Guide.

The Guardian league tables rank the University of Surrey No. 1 nationally for Music, No. 2 nationally for Drama & Dance, and No. 4 nationally in the overall league table.

As Director of Learning & Teaching for the School of Arts, Dr Christopher Wiley has taken a lead in developing the School’s learning & teaching and student experience strategies. This has included the initiatives by which its students have been engaged in completion of the National Student Survey, the latest results for which similarly placed the School’s subject areas at No. 1 and No. 2 nationally.

The Guardian league tables represent one of the most influential rankings of UK universities, and incorporate multiple metrics from the National Student Survey including student satisfaction with teaching, satisfaction with feedback and assessment, and overall satisfaction with the course.

Further information on the successes of the School of Arts in The Guardian league tables 2017 may be found here: http://blogs.surrey.ac.uk/arts/2016/05/23/guardian-league-table-2017-results-music-at-no-1-drama-dance-at-no-2/

Proud-to-be-top-5-in-the-Guardian-University-Guide

 

Dr Christopher Wiley organizes Learning and Teaching development event at the University of Surrey

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School of Arts Learning & Teaching event, University of SurreyDr Christopher Wiley organized a half-day Learning and Teaching development event for the School of Arts at the University of Surrey on 12 January 2016. This was the fifth forum of this nature in two years (see information about previous events here), and involved some 40 staff from across the institution.

This event incorporated a training session led by the University’s Student Services on the pastoral side of Personal Tutoring, as well as a discussion forum on student evaluation of teaching facilitated by Dr Wiley, which considered how academic staff might seek to maximize the effectiveness of feedback received from students for purposes of ongoing teaching enhancement.

A blog post written by Dr Wiley, in which the School of Arts Learning and Teaching symposia are discussed, has recently appeared on the Association of National Teaching Fellows blog. The post, entitled ‘How do National Teaching Fellows make a contribution in their institution?’, may be read at the following link:

http://ntf-association.com/national-teaching-fellows/how-do-national-teaching-fellows-make-a-contribution-in-their-institution/

Update: With over 400 reads in the week in which it appeared, Dr Wiley’s post set a new record for the Association of National Teaching Fellows blog.

Dr Christopher Wiley receives nominations for multiple University awards in 2015

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Dr Christopher Wiley has received awards and nominations for several major teaching prizes at the University of Surrey in 2015, after less than two years in post as Director of Learning and Teaching for the School of Arts.

USSU Awards 2015In April 2015, Dr Wiley was nominated for The Lynne Millward Award for Academic Staff Member of the Year, which is run by the University of Surrey Students’ Union (awards ceremony pictured, right). Nominations for this award are submitted by the students themselves and it is therefore highly competitive.

Then in June, Dr Wiley was announced as the winner of the Faculty Learning and Teaching Award for the Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences (prior to its becoming the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences), as well as being shortlisted for The Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Award.

Finally, at a prestigious awards ceremony on 23 November 2015 (pictured below), Dr Wiley was announced as the runner-up for The Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Award. This award recognises sustained excellence in teaching, innovative curriculum development, and enhancement of the student experience – thereby illustrating the impact that Dr Wiley has made within the University of Surrey in a relatively short space of time.

Vice-Chancellor's Awards 2015

 

Dr Wiley convenes inaugural School of Arts ‘Opportunities and Networking’ event at the University of Surrey

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School of Arts 'Opportunities and Networking' Event, University of Surrey

The School of Arts at the University of Surrey held its first ‘Opportunities and Networking’ event in the Ivy main auditorium, Ivy Arts Centre on Thursday 8 October 2015, organized by Dr Christopher Wiley.

Over 100 students were in attendance across the subject areas of Music and Sound Recording, Theatre, Dance, Digital Media Arts, and the Guildford School of Acting.

The event introduced students to the many different possibilities for them to collaborate with one another on different School of Arts programmes, provided them with information about extra-curricular University activities related to the arts, facilitated their networking with students elsewhere in the School, and enabled them to register their interest in collaborating with one another via sign-up sheets.

Dr Wiley compèred the event, which featured contributions from range of other School of Arts staff as well as students. The evening ended with a series of networking activities designed to enable students to meet one another and to discuss their interests in collaborating on arts projects, followed by more informal opportunities to chat over pizza and soft drinks.

This ‘Opportunities and Networking’ event follows in the footsteps of an equally successful and well-attended panel discussion on ‘Careers in the Arts’, co-organized by Dr Wiley and hosted by the School of Arts earlier in the year.

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